dinnerandashow

Silence is of the gods; monkeys chatter. - Buster Keaton

8 notes

“This shot with Keaton and the policemen carries an interesting back caption …
—- COMEDIAN TURNED DIRECTOR … Joseph “Buster” Keaton, one of motion picture’s greatest comedians, has turned director, and his first assignment is a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer short subject. Here he is amusing some of the cast between scenes.
The short in question is more than likely Life In Sometown, USA, one of the three single-reelers Keaton directed in 1938 for MGM release.”
— found at greenbriarpictureshows.blogspot.com

… turned director … TURNED DIRECTOR!!! … Really MGM??? … REALLY!!!   You made Buster Keaton a director?  REALLY!!!!
Dang! Why does this make me so angry?

This shot with Keaton and the policemen carries an interesting back caption

—- COMEDIAN TURNED DIRECTOR … Joseph “Buster” Keaton, one of motion picture’s greatest comedians, has turned director, and his first assignment is a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer short subject. Here he is amusing some of the cast between scenes.

The short in question is more than likely Life In Sometown, USA, one of the three single-reelers Keaton directed in 1938 for MGM release.”

— found at greenbriarpictureshows.blogspot.com

… turned director … TURNED DIRECTOR!!! … Really MGM??? … REALLY!!!   You made Buster Keaton a director?  REALLY!!!!

Dang! Why does this make me so angry?

Filed under Buster Keaton MGM stupid mgm 1930s film director

122 notes

Behind the scenes photos from Buster Keaton’s “Our Hospitality”.

The waterfall and mountain backdrop were constructed over the swimming pool at the studio. As usual, Keaton performed the dangerous stunt himself. A mannequin was used for the girl. It took three tries, and a doctor was called to treat Keaton in between takes, but they finally got the shot he wanted.

gif source: silentlocations

Filed under Buster Keaton Our Hospitality old hollywood silent film 1920s stunt stuntman filmmakers film director film actor

69 notes

nitrateglow:

goodedison:

tgreywolfe1:

Buster Keaton with his sons, his father, Joe, and … his MGM sweater on the end of the couch.
I never noticed the sweater before … it’s in several other photos … he must have really liked that sweater.

I always assumed he broke off his relationship with his father? Or it sounded like an abusive relationship?

The truth is more complicated than that.
Buster did not have an abusive childhood nor was the relationship with his father this nightmarish ordeal, as is so often spouted by certain biographers who want to turn all of his films into psychodramas.
Joe Keaton did not become an alcoholic until Buster was in his late teens and that was when his behavior became abusive, causing Buster and his mother Myra to leave Joe’s ass behind. Joe got cleaned up though and Buster cast him in small roles in his films (two notable examples are Neighbors and The General).
I’m not sure if Buster ever shared a close relationship with Joe, but aside from that small pocket of time in which the old man drank heavily, I don’t think their bond was an abusive one. Anyone else have any thoughts on the matter?

I actually have a lot of thoughts on this matter, but it’s difficult to boil them down in a few words, so I’m now inspired to write a long, and most likely tedious, post on this issue in the near future.  For the moment, though, I’ll say that in my opinion the relationship between the father and son in “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” probably bears a resemblance to Buster and Joe’s relationship.  

nitrateglow:

goodedison:

tgreywolfe1:

Buster Keaton with his sons, his father, Joe, and … his MGM sweater on the end of the couch.

I never noticed the sweater before … it’s in several other photos … he must have really liked that sweater.

I always assumed he broke off his relationship with his father? Or it sounded like an abusive relationship?

The truth is more complicated than that.

Buster did not have an abusive childhood nor was the relationship with his father this nightmarish ordeal, as is so often spouted by certain biographers who want to turn all of his films into psychodramas.

Joe Keaton did not become an alcoholic until Buster was in his late teens and that was when his behavior became abusive, causing Buster and his mother Myra to leave Joe’s ass behind. Joe got cleaned up though and Buster cast him in small roles in his films (two notable examples are Neighbors and The General).

I’m not sure if Buster ever shared a close relationship with Joe, but aside from that small pocket of time in which the old man drank heavily, I don’t think their bond was an abusive one. Anyone else have any thoughts on the matter?

I actually have a lot of thoughts on this matter, but it’s difficult to boil them down in a few words, so I’m now inspired to write a long, and most likely tedious, post on this issue in the near future.  For the moment, though, I’ll say that in my opinion the relationship between the father and son in “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” probably bears a resemblance to Buster and Joe’s relationship.  

74 notes

I’ve been studying this photo of Buster for a few days.
It’s near the end of his tenure at MGM and at the beginning of the lowest point in his life. The heavy make-up can’t hide the strain he’s been under working for a movie factory. Thinning hair, furrowed brow, lines, wrinkles, sweat beading on his forehead. He’s only thirty-seven but looks much older. And though he’s expressionless, the picture gives me feelings of uncertainty and exhaustion.
The fact that he made it through these difficult times without bitterness toward anyone demonstrates what a truly remarkable person he was.
At any age, 
the face of Buster Keaton is … 
always beautiful, 
always mysterious, 
always fascinating.

I’ve been studying this photo of Buster for a few days.

It’s near the end of his tenure at MGM and at the beginning of the lowest point in his life. The heavy make-up can’t hide the strain he’s been under working for a movie factory. Thinning hair, furrowed brow, lines, wrinkles, sweat beading on his forehead. He’s only thirty-seven but looks much older. And though he’s expressionless, the picture gives me feelings of uncertainty and exhaustion.

The fact that he made it through these difficult times without bitterness toward anyone demonstrates what a truly remarkable person he was.

At any age,

the face of Buster Keaton is … 

always beautiful,

always mysterious,

always fascinating.

Filed under Buster Keaton